Good Practices


School Good Practices

In the 1st year of SISM2, there were 4 Testing districts. These districts are namely;

 

  • Solukhumbu in Eastern Region,
  • Rupandehi in Western Region,
  • Jumla in Mid Western Region, and
  • Doti in Far Western Region


Among these districts, 65 cases of school good practices were collected. Since the interviews were made only a few weeks after the SISM2 school level workshop, respondents tended to reply from their previous experiences.
 

1.  Collected Cases of School Good Practices

Based on data of the End-line Survey which was conducted in May 2014, collected cases of school good practices are categorized into nine types. The table below shows them.
 

Table 1 Good Practice Categorization

Good Practice

No.of cases

%

(1) Promotion of students' attendance and motivation for study

11

17%

(2) SIP formulation, planning, involving various stakeholders

11

17%

(3) Promotion of students' enrollment (household visit, talking with parents)

10

15%

(4) Improvement of school environment

9

14%

(5)Additional school activity (essay contest, excursion, child-club and other extra-curricular  
activities)

8

12%

(6) Promoting students' cleanliness and health

8

12%

(7) Additional school activity for academic development (teaching in English, coaching)

4

6%

(8) Communication improvement (between teacher and parents as well as teacher and students)

3

5%

(9) Improvement of educational materials

1

2%

Total

65

100%

Source: SISM2 End-line Survey of Testing Districts

 

As the table above shows, “promotion of students’ attendance and motivation for studying” as well as “SIP formulation, planning, involving various stakeholders” have the largest numbers. In addition, “Promotion of students’ enrollment”, “Improvement of school environment”, “Additional school activity”, and “Promoting students’ cleanliness and health” are also major activities of school good practices. One good reason why “SIP formulation, planning, involving various stakeholders” has a large number is derived from the SISM2 training and the school level workshop activity.

In addition to the nine categorization, these good practices can be divided into two groups. The first one is ‘School Management Group’, and the other is ‘Quality Improvement Group’.  The table below shows them.

 

Table 2 Groups of Good Practices

Group

Good Practices

School Management Group

(1) Promotion of students' attendance and motivation for study
(2) SIP formulation, planning, involving various stakeholders
(3) Promotion of students' enrollment (household visit, talking with parents)
(4) Improvement of school environment
(6) Promoting students' cleanliness and health
(8) Communication improvement (between teacher and parents as well as teacher and students)

Quality Improvement Group

(5) Additional school activity (essay contest, excursion, child-club and other extra-curricular activities)
(7) Additional school activity for academic development (teaching in English, coaching)
(9) Improvement of educational materials

Note: The numbers are related to the nine categorization

Source: SISM2 End-line Survey of Testing Districts

 

As shown on Table 2, the number of good practices of the school management group is larger than the quality improvement group. But, the proportion of the two groups is not extreme. It can be said that it is reasonable.

The next table shows the number of school good practices in each district. It is seen that there are not substantial differences among the four Testing Districts. Rupandhehi and Solkuhumbu relatively have variety compared to Doti and Jumla.



Table 3 Good Practices by District

Good practice

Doti

Jumla

Rupan-
dhehi

Soluk-
humbu

Total

(1) Promotion of students' attendance and motivation for study

3

5

2

1

11

(2) SIP formulation, planning, involving various stakeholders

-

-

2

9

11

(3)Promotion of students' enrollment (household visit, talking with parents)

-

4

4

2

10

(4) Improvement of school environment

1

4

2

2

9

(5) Additional school activity (essay contest, excursion, child-club and other extra-curricular activities)

2

1

3

2

8

(6) Promoting students' cleanliness and health

2

-

5

1

8

(7) Additional school activity for academic development (teaching in English,coaching)

1

3

-

-

4

(8)Communication improvement (between teacher and parents as well as teacher and students)

1

-

1

1

3

(9)Improvement of educational materials

-

-

1

-

1

Total

10

17

20

18

65

Source: SISM2 End-line Survey of Testing Districts

 

The next table shows the number of school good practices in terms of school size. Primary school has a tendency to have basic school management activities such as “Promotion of Students’ Enrollment”, “Promotion of Students Attendance and Motivation for Study”, and “Promoting Students’ Cleanliness and Health”.

 

 

 Table 4 Good Practices by School Size

Good Practice

PS

SS

LSS

HSS

Total

(1) Promotion of students' attendance and motivation for study

6

1

3

1

11

(2) SIP formulation, planning, involving various stakeholders

6

1

4

 

11

(3) Promotion of students' enrollment (household visit, talking with parents)

7

 

3

 

10

(4)Improvement of school environment

3

2

2

2

9

(5) Additional school activity (essay contest, excursion, child-club and other extra-curricular activities)

3

1

2

2

8

(6) Promoting students' cleanliness and health

7

 

1

 

8

(7) Additional school activity for academic development (teaching in English, coaching)

1

2

 

1

4

(8)Communication improvement (between teacher and parents as well as teacher and students)

2

1

 

 

3

(9) Improvement of educational materials

1

 

 

 

1

Total

36

8

15

6

65

Source: SISM2 End-line Survey of Testing Districts

 

2.  Funding Resources

 

As shown on the figure below, the funding resources for the 65 school good practice activities are mainly from school internal budget (37%). Parent’s contribution also accounts for a large part of the funding resources (parent’s contribution is 5%, and school internal and parents contribution is 8%). In addition, there are 12% of non-budget activities.

Figure 1 Funding Resources for Good Practices

Note: These figures are particularly based on good practices, not reflected to all school activities

Source: SISM2 End-line Survey of Testing Districts

 


The next figure shows the proportion of funding resources excluding SISM2’s funds. The SISM2’s fund was only utilized for SIP formulation.

Figure 2 Funding Resources for Good Practices Excluding SISM2 Fund

Note: These figures are particularly based on good practices, not reflected to all school activities

Source: SISM2 End-line Survey of Testing Districts

 

The largest funding resource is “School Internal” budget (44%), followed by “School Internal and Parents Contribution” (9%) and “Donors and School” budget (9%). It can be also seen that the budget from the community (“School Internal”, “Parents Contribution”, and “School Internal and Parents Contribution” in total) is around 60%. If “Non-budget” is also considered as a community contribution, the proportion of the community contribution would be 74%. Thus, activities of school good practices are mostly supported by community.
 

 3.  Relation of Good Practice and Funding Resources


As mentioned previously, there are 54 cases of school good practices supported by community, government and outside resources excluding the SISM2 funds. The figure below shows the relation of school good practices and funding resources. “Promotion of Students’ Enrollment” and “Promotion of Student’s Attendance and Motivation” were implemented without any budget. Nobody denies that these are very important practices for schools, and the figure shows that these activities can be done without money. This fact would encourage other schools.

Figure 3 Relation between Good Practices and Funding Resources

 Source: SISM2 End-line Survey of Testing Districts
 

Overall, most of the school good practices are low-budgetary activities except “Promoting Students’ Cleanliness and Health”. Schools utilize their own funds or collect funds from the parents.

 

4.  Inventive Activities

There are some schools that have been conducting inventive activities. Some examples are shown on the table below

Table 5 Inventive School Good Practices in Testing Districts

Good practice

Background and outcome

Operating extra class for slow learning students
[Shree Chandnath Secondary School, Jumla]

To make students have confidence in learning, the school provided extra classes after school hours for grade 6-10 students. The school collected Rp.20-30 from parents of the students. The subjects were English, Mathematics, Science, Nepalese and others.
Since the activity was implemented, students have been studying hard, and their interest in learning has been increased.

Meeting with teachers and students to discuss learning of a week
[Shree Kalika Secondary School, Jumla]

On every Friday, teachers and students interact each other to share the achievement in the week. Students can review what they have learned, and they can ask question to teachers.

Grade teacher
[Kalika Primary school, Jumla]

A teacher has a responsibility for one class. He/she needs to take care of whole class activities. It has been contributed to increase discipline, regularity and cleanliness in the classroom.

School report distribution
[Shree Krishna Primary School, Doti]

Parents as well as students had been prioritizing household work over study. After starting distribution of school report, parents and students became aware of importance of study. The number of students’ regular attendance has increased.

Friday activity
[Shree Jan Sudhar Primary School, Solukhumbu]

Friday activity, such as drawing competition, quiz contest and others were conducted every month. It brought students’ positive attitude in classroom.

Cleanliness committee
[Shree Saraswoti Secondary School Rupandehi, Rupandehi]

Classroom, bathroom and school environment were untidy. After establishing Cleanliness Committee of students, cleanliness in the school was improved, and it brought discipline in the classroom.

Source: SISM2 End-line Survey of Testing Districts